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As Senior Advisors and Advocates, We Understand and We Can Help

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The Many Faces of Advocacy – Do You Need a Seniors Advocate? The term advocate should not be taken lightly. Its origins come from Roman Law Courts. In 1689, the Faculty of Advocates library was opened in Edinburgh. According to my Oxford Dictionary printed in 1962, advocate means professional pleader in a Court of justice, a counsel; one who pleads for another; one who speaks for a cause. According…
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As we age, the ability to make our own choices and decisions can slip away from us. We start to lose decision-making ability…perhaps not because we are incapable but because we tend to consider decisions differently, giving them more thought and time. Yet the world around us is becoming more fast-paced; it seems everyone wants instant answers without the time to hear us out. How do we continue to…
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Published in the Scrivener Magazine Summer 2016 We are able to look at elder care through various mediums to get a worldwide perspective.  Whether it’s through taking online courses, reading international articles, newsletters, joining international organizations or travelling and working in other countries it is much easier to share our knowledge today. Last year I had the wonderful opportunity…
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Published in: http://www.notaries.bc.ca/scrivener There are unscrupulous people who befriend unsuspecting vulnerable seniors with a goal of defrauding them of their savings and income. Who are these people who prey on the vulnerable? Some of these are professional fraudsters and not so professional trolling for victims. It may be surprising to learn that the greatest reported percentage of financial…
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I recently had an article published in the Notary Society of BC’s spring edition of Scrivener Magazine, 2015, Volume 24(1). The caregiving role may be a short stint or long term, but it often plays a role in stress and chronic stress. Approximately 350,000 people (7.5% of the population) in BC are between the ages of 75 and 90. Currently, 70,000 people in BC are living with Alzheimer’s or some…
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